Academic Affairs and Standards Council


Guiding Principles 
Committee Members
Meeting Schedule
Proposal Submission Guidelines
AASC Approval Process
Process for Submitting a New Course Proposal
Course Proposals
Program Proposals
Academic Standards or Policy Proposals

Guiding Principles

Anoka-Ramsey Community College continually reviews and assesses its curriculum. Throughout this process, the College is committed to developing students’ commitment to lifelong learning through clear thinking, effective communication, accepting diversity, and ethical decision making.  As a result, the College will provide learning experiences that promote learning in the following areas:

  • thinking through reasoning, creating, and reflecting
  • integrating information with experience and expressing insights
  • understanding and respecting individuals and local, regional, national, and global communities
  • maintaining responsibility for environmental, political, economic, social, and personal concerns

1.  Clear Thinking  

Goal :  To develop within students an intellectual and intuitive process characterized by open-mindedness, reason, creativity, flexibility, and reflection at every stage of the process.

   Student Competencies:  

Students will be able to

a.     demonstrate factual thinking by gathering, organizing, and using relevant information to discover structure and pattern. 

b.     demonstrate logical thinking by identifying relevant information, defining problems, and formulating hypotheses.

c.     demonstrate evaluative thinking by stating criteria for making judgments and recognizing individual and group differences within judgment criteria.

d.     demonstrate imaginative thinking by seeking larger contexts and alternate perspectives, connecting known to unknown, and seeking alternative means of understanding and expression.

 

2.  Effective Communication  

Goal:   To develop within students the ability to integrate information with experience; to express insights; and to engage in the clear exchange of ideas, thoughts, and feelings. 

   Student Competencies:

Students will be able to

a.     access information and resources effectively.

b.     identify their own strengths and weaknesses as communicators.

c.     demonstrate an analytic approach to effective communication.

d.     communicate with varied audiences for a variety of purposes using a variety of means.

e.     communicate in general, specialized, and integrated areas of knowledge.

 

3.  Accepting Diversity  

Goal:   To develop within students the abilities to recognize similarities and differences among individuals, ideas, and communities; to understand and respect individuals within local, regional, national, and global communities; and to promote inquiry into and respect for similarities and differences in our communities.

   Student Competencies:  

Students will be able to

a.     recognize the cultural basis of their own beliefs, attitudes, and biases.

b.     recognize similarities and differences of diverse groups in our communities.

c.     understand the interrelationships among communities.

d.     demonstrate the skills and attitudes necessary for living within a diverse society with mutual respect and cooperation.

 

4.  Ethical Decision Making  

Goal:  To develop within students skills based upon an articulated moral system for choosing among alternatives and taking responsibility for decisions and their consequences within environmental, political, economic, social, and personal contexts.

   Student Competencies:  

Students will be able to

a.     examine and articulate their own moral systems.

b.     recognize and evaluate alternatives, including an examination of potential consequences.

c .     understand the environmental, political, economic, social, and personal context for ethical decision making.

d.  accept responsibility for decisions and their consequences.

 

Committee Members 

Faculty:

Administrators:

Jim Biederman, Psychology
Jennifer Braido, Biology
Gary Cook, Wellness (alt)
Dierk Hofreiter, Physics
Bruce Homann, History
Adam Krenelka, Math (alt)
Kirsten Olsen, Sociology
Gina Pancerella Willis, Library
Patty Pieper, Chemistry
Joe Schoen, Economics
Jennifer Willcutt, Reading

Deidra Peaslee, CAO
Natasha Baer, Assoc. Dean of Ed. Services
Dana Irgens, Dean of Ed Services
Luanne Kane, Dean of Ed. Services (alt.)
Michael Werner, Director, Program Dev.

Meeting Schedule:

The third Friday of every month (exceptions in 2012-2013 will be: 10/19 will be on October 26, 3/15 will be on March 22 and May 3 is only if necessary).

Proposal Submission Guidelines 

 1. Proposals should be developed within the Divisional structure, including colleagues from both campuses.
 2. Consider whether the course should be proposed as an experimental course.

a. Experimental courses can potentially become permanent courses if successful.

b. Experimental courses can transfer to another college (usually as elective credit) but they cannot be included in the MnTC. However, you may indicate the areas (no more than two) where it would be included should it later be proposed to move to a regular course.

c. Experimental courses are numbered 1189.

d. Experimental courses can be offered up to three times and then must either be proposed as a regular course or dropped.

e. Experimental courses are approved by the supervising Dean and are presented to the AASC as information items.

f. When an experimental course is proposed to become a regular course, enrollment data for the three semesters it was offered must be reviewed to evaluate the viability of the course.

 3. Consider whether the course should be proposed as a topics course.

a. Topics courses address current interest or special needs that are usually short lived.

b. Topics courses can transfer to another college (usually as elective credit) but they cannot be included in the MnTC.

c. Topics courses are numbered 1189.

d. Topics courses can be offered up to three times and then must either be proposed as a regular course or dropped.

e. Topics courses are approved by the supervising Dean and are presented to the AASC as information items.

 4. Consider whether the course should be proposed as a regular course.

a. A regular course will be included in the College Catalog and should have the potential for longevity.

b. For a regular course to be viable, it should be possible to offer it within the academic discipline at least once every two years.

c. To obtain a course number, consult with the Rhonda Kern in the Registration and Records office. Consider whether the course should be numbered at the developmental, 1000, or 2000 level.

d. Determine if the course is appropriate for inclusion in the MnTC. To be included in the MnTC, the course should have a primary focus on general education (as opposed to technical, program-specific skills). The course can be proposed to cover up to two MnTC emphasis areas, which must be major areas of focus within the course. For each emphasis area, the course must meet a minimum of 51% of the student competencies to be approved.

5. Prepare the correct Proposal Form and a Common Course Outline for the course.

a. These forms are found in the N:\Ed Services\AASC folder.

b. The proposal form will require basic information about the course, a brief statement of the proposed change, and a brief rationale to support the change. You should list a recommended class size for the new course, along with an academic rationale in support. You should note the recommendation you received from your division and the date the discussion occurred. Finally, you should complete the questions and submit the proposal to your supervising Dean for review.

c. All course proposals require submission of an updated Common Course Outline. If the proposal recommends a change in an existing CCO, the new CCO should indicate changes in legislative format (deletions in strikethrough, additions underlined). If the changes are extensive, you can also submit the existing CCO unchanged with the new version.

d. Submit the proposal (hard copy and electronic copy) to the AASC secretary, Valerie Knight, in Educational Services by the assigned time (usually the first of the month). The proposal will be assigned a number and will be included on the next agenda. The agenda is published in the College Bulletin with the brief description and rationale for each proposal included.

 6. Be prepared to attend the Academic Affairs and Standards meeting to answer questions pertaining to your proposal. This may not be necessary in the case of experimental courses; please consult with your supervising dean or the AASC chair.
 
 

AASC Approval Process

 1. A proposal can be approved in one meeting if there are no major objections from Council members. Where further discussion is required, the proposal will be held over as a continued item for the following meeting. The Council will advise you whether you need to attend the next meeting.

2. If your proposal would necessitate a change in the upcoming College Catalog (new courses, deleted courses, program changes), the proposal would have to be approved by publication deadlines. Please contact the AASC chair or the Chief Academic Officer for specific publication deadlines.

3. The decision of the Council will be published in the College Bulletin as part of the minutes. Names of Council members are also published with the agenda and the minutes so faculty or staff members with concerns can raise them with members of the Council. AASC decisions may be reversed by the College President. If this happens, the reversal will be noted in the next AASC minutes.

4. The Council has adopted the following process for voting on proposals:

a. Two-thirds of the Council membership needs to be present to constitute the quorum necessary to hold a meeting.

b. The Council will make diligent effort to achieve consensus on all proposals and action items.

c. When consensus is not reached, a two-thirds majority vote would be required to end discussion on proposals and move to a vote.

d. Once discussion has ended, the Council would move to an immediate vote on the proposal and a simple majority (50% plus one member) would be required to approve a proposal. Actual vote tallies would be recorded in the minutes at the discretion of the Council.

e. The Council has agreed to review this voting procedure at a later date if problems arise.

 

Process for Submitting a New Course Proposal

Types of Proposals/Forms for Proposals

 The Academic Affairs and Standards Council reviews proposals on all matters included in academic affairs, including course outlines, degree requirements, academic standards, course and program components, and the inventory of course and program offerings. Proposals submitted to the Council along with final action by the Council are published in the College Bulletin. Generally, proposals are divided into these categories: course proposals (add, change, delete/suspend), program proposals (add, change, delete/suspend), and academic standard/policy proposals (add, change, delete). Proposal forms can be found on the N:Ed Services/AASC folder.

Course Proposals

There are five types of course proposals:

 1. ADD a Course Proposal Form is used to add a new course to the permanent inventory of courses listed in the College Catalog. Historically we have added new courses after they have been successfully offered on an experimental basis, but occasionally exceptions are made. In addition to the New Course Proposal Form, a new Common Course Outline must be submitted.
 2.Add a Topics Course Proposal Form is used to propose a topics course, which is always numbered 1189. Topics courses are courses that address current interest or special needs or for which a faculty member may have a special expertise. These courses are not intended to become permanent offerings and may only be taught three times. They cannot be included in programs, including the MnTC, and will not be listed in the College Catalog. They also may not have a prerequisite. In addition to the Topics Course Proposal Form, a Common Course Outline must be submitted as information items to the AASC. Approval of topics courses is made through supervising deans.
 3. Add an Experimental Course Proposal Form is used to propose an experimental course, which is always numbered 1189. Experimental courses are courses with the potential to become permanent, depending on the success of the class when offered. Experimental courses can be offered a maximum of three times and must then be dropped or proposed as a new course. They cannot be included in programs, including the MnTC, and will not be listed in the College Catalog. They also may not have a prerequisite. In addition to the Experimental Course Proposal Form, a Common Course Outline must be submitted as information items to the AASC. Approval of experimental courses is made through supervising deans.
 4. Course Change Proposal Form is used to propose modest changes to a course, including course title, catalog description, credit value, prerequisites, learner outcomes, Minnesota Transfer Curriculum inclusion, course content, and others. If course changes are significant enough to make the revised course distinct from the original, a new course will need to be created and the existing course will need to be deleted. This is also the case when the course number is changed. In addition to the Course Change Proposal Form, a copy of the Common Course Outline revised in legislative format should be submitted.
 5. Course Deletion-Suspension Proposal Form is used to propose deletion or suspension of a course. This form should be submitted with a current copy of the Common Course Outline.
 

Program Proposals

 In addition to AASC proposal forms, program proposals often require submission of extensive paperwork to the MnSCU Office of the Chancellor. You should work closely with your dean in developing your program submissions.
 

 

There are three types of program proposals:

 

1.      New Program Proposal Form is required when submitting a new program for approval.  In addition to the New Program Proposal Form, you should submit copies of program guide sheets, Program Assessment Plan, MnSCU program applications, and any occupational/market studies completed.   

2.      Program Change Proposal Form is used to propose any type of change to an approved program, including required and elective coursework, program goals, credit amounts, prerequisites, and catalog descriptions.  A revised guide sheet, prepared in legislative format, should be submitted with the Program Change Proposal Form.  If the proposed change affects the current program assessment plan, a revised program assessment plan should also be submitted.

 3.      Program Deletion-Suspension Proposal Form is used to propose a temporary suspension of an inactive program or a permanent deletion.  A current copy of the program guide sheet should be submitted along with the proposal form.

Academic Standard/Policy Proposals

Proposals can be made on a wide variety of academic standards, which are often published in the College Catalog or the Faculty Handbook, and academic policies, which are published in the College Policies and Procedures Manual.  The Academic Policy-Standard Proposal Form is used to make all types of proposals, including proposals to add, change, or delete standards or policies.  In the case of new policies or standards, a copy of the new policy or standard statement should accompany the proposal form.  In the case of changing existing policies or standards, the policy or standard statement should be submitted revised in legislative format.  In the case of deleting a policy or standard, a copy of the existing statement should be submitted.  

PEOPLE TO CONTACT

Jim Biederman, Chair 763-433-1209

Deidra Peaslee, CAO 763-433-1829

Valerie Knight, Secretary and Recorder 763-433-1429

Important Dates